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Friday, October 31 2014 @ 07:38 AM UTC

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Pilot program: Speed sensors trigger red light on Philly road

Biking ElsewhereB' Sokes: I love this idea! I can't wait to hear if it really makes a difference.

http://articles.philly.com/2013-11-19/news/44246715_1_kelly-drive-speed-limit-sensors
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A Law Like No Other

Biking Elsewhere[B' Spokes: A very good explanation of what's wrong with our "Ride as Far Right as Practicable" law. I'll add something to this argument, bicycling law does makes no mention of maintaining a straight and predictable course. A Baltimore City Police stopped me once for not riding far right (translation not riding in the parking space of three cars.) I asked if he thought weaving in and out of traffic was safer?

As typical, here are some highlights:]

by Keri, Commute Orlando

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Most laws are clear and reinforce safety.

Most traffic laws have a clear purpose — to reinforce the rules of movement that make roadway users predictable to one another. These laws don’t interfere with road users’ ability to travel safely. They’re barely even noticeable to the conscientious driver, who appreciates enforcement of them because that makes the system safer for him.

When a normal traffic citation is challenged, it is challenged on the basis of whether or not the driver was breaking a clearly defined law. Did the driver make a complete stop at the stop sign? Did the driver enter the intersection before or after the light turned red. Was the driver going faster than the speed limit? Interpretation of the law itself is not the issue. The issue is whether or not the police officer accurately witnessed the infraction. In many cases, people contest traffic citations in the hope that the officer won’t show up in court (providing automatic dismissal), or they seek to have the points removed from their record. No one would ever argue that they were speeding or running a red light because it was safer.

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Bicyclists are the only vehicle drivers who must defend themselves to an officer or judge for driving defensively.

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In every scenario, the bicyclist suffers some loss, even though he was operating lawfully!

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http://commuteorlando.com/wordpress/2013/11/19/a-law-like-no-other/
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9 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD NEVER BIKE TO WORK

Biking Elsewhere[B' Spokes: If you love satire, you'll love this! And remember, no one’s ever been killed when they’re inside an automobile. ;) ]

http://semi-rad.com/2011/06/9-reasons-why-you-should-never-bike-to-work/
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Holiday reader: The war on bikes

Biking Elsewhere[B' Spokes: I say this is a must read, but a few highlights.]
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by David Alpert, Greater Greater Washington

"Is it okay to kill cyclists?" That's the question an op-ed in the New York Times asks. It's not, but if a spate of other op-eds are any indication, it's sure okay to hate them and the facilities they ask for in a quest for safety.
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But studies performed in Arizona, Minnesota and Hawaii suggest that drivers are at fault in more than half of cycling fatalities.
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legal to kill people, even when it is clearly your fault, as long you're driving a car and the victim is on a bike
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To a lot of people, though, the problem in our society isn't that those who hit and kill cyclists face no consequences; the problem is that those damn cyclists are in the way of driving faster.
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Except, Caldwell argues, since our transportation system is over capacity, that means we can't afford to give up a single square foot of asphalt to cyclists or let them slow down drivers. Never mind that you can move more people in less space when some drive and some bike,
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But, as many have said many times before, if there is a war on cars, why are cyclists the casualties?
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http://greatergreaterwashington.org/post/20759/holiday-reader-the-war-on-bikes/
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Who Pays For Our Roads?

Biking Elsewhere image

Bicycle Transportation Alliance
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The top obstacle to cycling in Maryland

Biking ElsewhereTop obstacle to cycling was motorists do not exercise caution around cyclists (84% of respondents).

MARYLAND TWENTY-YEAR BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN MASTER PLAN draft
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What would it take to change that?

Biking ElsewhereBy Sarah Goodyear, The Atlantic Cities

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What would it take to change that?

Clearly marked and fully separated bicycle infrastructure might help to do the trick. When survey subjects were shown images of brightly painted protected bike lanes, they had an overwhelmingly positive response. One picture of people riding bikes in a green-painted lane separated from cars by reflective poles got a favorable reaction from 90 percent of the people who saw it, all of whom were registered voters who own bikes but don’t regularly ride.

In contrast, a picture of a lane marked only by white stripes of paint, with cars encroaching from both sides, got an 87 percent negative reaction.

 
Guess which of these people prefer? Images courtesy of People for Bikes.

But the survey reveals the complexity of our emotional response to bicycling. When asked to evaluate a series of messages about reasons to ride bikes, 60 percent responded favorably to the idea that biking makes you feel happier, has significant health benefits, and saves money. The message that biking "is a safe option for everyone" and that safety increases with more riders and better bike lanes, got a favorable rating from only 47 percent of respondents.

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That seems sort of obvious to Doug Gordon, who blogs at Brooklyn Spoke. "Look at the automobile industry," he said in the report. "If they really wanted to appeal to people’s safety, they would show crash statistics, survival rates.... You don’t see that any more. You see the car parked in the driveway and the family playing catch."

http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2013/11/selling-public-biking-political-campaign-style/7544/

[B' Spokes: Imagine an ad campaign "It's easier to die in your car in a crash than win the Maryland lottery." Car ads are designed to sell anything but the horrors of rush hour traffic. Every day on the news, car crashes scattered all over the city and yet people think cycling is dangerous. :/

And Baltimore City please take note, the picture of the bike lane with a 87% negative reaction is a lot better then bike lanes we have been getting. Please, please something better now and then, especially on critical trunk routes.]
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Clever idea to create awareness of pedestrian issues

Biking ElsewhereA motorists moving violation includes 2 hours of community service as a crosswalk guard.

Via Alliance for Biking and Walking webinar.
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If a picture is worth a 1000 words then how much is an animated gif worth?

Biking Elsewhereimage

Via Nicola Deiana - Public transportation
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New Pedestrian Maps In NY

Biking ElsewhereBy Aleks Buczkowski, geoawesomeness.com/

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This year the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) prepared something for them and for us - a new program of pedestrian maps called WalkNYC. ‘The other people’ will get a new set of city maps that will make it easier to navigate the city streets and find nearby interesting places. What we will get are beautiful maps that are a combination of cartography, great design and well-thought-out user experience.

The maps are designed to encourage people to walk, bike and use public transit, and feature all local streets and major landmarks and destinations, as well as bike lanes. Kiosks displays a large map of the streets with a 5-minute walking distance marked as ring, and another map showing the area in relation to a larger section of the city. This is cool but we’ve seen it on many city maps.

But there is one feature which corresponds to the experience of mobile maps rather than old school analogue cartography… The orientation of the maps! WalkNYC uses heads-up orientation rather than north arrow which is one of traditional mapping dogmas. This mean that the orientation of the map corresponds with the direction the user is facing. This is a smartphone-like approach but I love it and it actually makes a lot of sense (similarly to mobile maps).
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http://geoawesomeness.com/somewhere-design-cartography-new-pedestrian-maps-ny/

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