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Tuesday, July 22 2014 @ 03:41 PM UTC
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Huntingdon Avenue to Wyman Park Path Use Survey

Biking in BaltimoreThe goal of this survey is to solicit public support, interest and input on a plan to make improvements to the path running from where Huntingdon Avenue dead-ends into 31st Street and becomes a thoroughfare down the park hill to Wyman Park Drive. (see map below). Your response is greatly appreciated!

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https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1emjC10-WMtBdwWdfdweo2BFT8WO1NOSbUIwyr7bOzZg/viewform
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Cumberland awarded $75,000 bikeways grant

Biking in MarylandBy Greg Larry, Cumberland Times-News

CUMBERLAND — A new $75,000 grant, with plans to add bicycle lanes to Frederick and Bedford streets, has been awarded to the city from the Maryland Bikeways Program.
...

“We have now become a place where a lot of bikers come,” said John DiFonzo, city engineer.

DiFonzo said that cyclists come mainly for the C&O Canal Towpath and Great Allegheny Passage.

“But they are also riding our streets,” said DiFonzo.
...

http://www.times-news.com/local/x1708326494/City-awarded-75-000-bikeways-grant
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[B' Spokes: Trails are great but they don't remove he need to go the same places as cars.]
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Bridge Redesign a Victory for Pedestrian, Cycling Advocates

News you will not see in Marylandby ABERGRENMILLER, Planetizen

The furor started last fall, when the Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) unveiled designs to retrofit the Glendale-Hyperion Bridge. The proposal lacked accommodations for pedestrians and bicyclists, instead suggested expanding vehicular lanes, removing one sidewalk, and installing a central “crash barrier,” Damien Newton writes.

The Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition, Enrich L.A., and other local organizations—together with plenty of individual walkers and cyclists—protested the move. As a result, the LADOT last week presented three new proposals, each of which include dedicated bike lanes and a road diet.
...

http://www.planetizen.com/node/67196
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Move Along: Upending the social order on our roads

Biking ElsewhereBy Jonathan Krall, Alexandria Times

While not intentional, biking and walking upset the transit social order. According to conventional thinking, roads are for cars, slow drivers are “bad drivers,” and cyclists and pedestrians should stay out of the way.

The idea that roads should be safe and effective for all users — the concept known as complete streets — aims to upend this social order, moving cars from first to last.

The longstanding order of the road is governed not by laws, but by socially enforced rules. For example, one might voluntarily drive below the speed limit on the Beltway.

That would be perfectly legal but likely would garner honks, flashing headlights and rude gestures. As everyone knows, appropriate driving speeds begin at the speed limit and extend upward, not downward. The power of these rules is such that police rarely issue a ticket, photographic or otherwise, for driving up to 10 mph above the speed limit.

All this came to mind the other day, when I was bicycling in violation of the social order. I was riding in the center of a narrow lane when a driver started honking at me. Shortly thereafter, he pulled alongside me and helpfully explained that cyclists are not allowed in the street unless they can ride at the speed limit.

This struck me as quite the head-scratcher. After all, isn’t the speed limit an upper limit? Those of us with Internet access have certainly read that cyclists should not be allowed on the road unless they “obey the law.” Riding at a typical bicycle speed surely complies with the law. Nevertheless, I’ve been told — even by friends — that cyclists must ride at the speed limit.

As it turns out, the speed limit is the single point of intersection between socially acceptable driving speeds and socially acceptable bicycling speeds. Cyclists who do not ride this tightrope — and that would be all of them — are in violation of at least one of these social conventions.

Despite endless discussions about safety and the law, increasingly it is clear to me that many people get upset by social rather than legal violations of the rules. While the majority of drivers remain polite, a vocal minority is extremely attached to the status quo.

As old gives way to new, outdated ideas fall by the wayside. One of these is that automobile traffic is an unstoppable force. As a pedestrian, it is up to me to get out of the way or suffer the consequences. As a cyclist, there is no point in asking for bike lanes because they would simply put me in harm’s way.

The complete-streets concept recognizes that individual drivers, cyclists and pedestrians rule traffic. Each is able to slow down and even stop to avoid a crash. Complete streets are updated streets, often with narrower traffic lanes that have been demonstrated to slow motorized traffic. With complete streets, pedestrians come first, followed by transit, cyclists and cars.
...

Responding to the failure of the automobile to deliver promises of speed and freedom to 100 percent of the population, people take up walking and bicycling
...

A 2012 nationwide poll, reported by McCann, showed that “63 percent of Americans would like to address traffic congestion by improving public transportation and designing communities for easier walking and bicycling.” While frustrating for some, these changes are supported by a majority of residents. The new social order, it seems, is here to stay.

http://alextimes.com/2014/02/move-along-upending-the-social-order-on-our-roads/
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The 10 cities where no one wants to drive

Biking in Baltimore By Alexander E.M. Hess and Thomas C. Frohlich, Yahoo Finance

...
6. Baltimore, MD
> Pct. of households without a vehicle: 31.2%
> Pct. commuting to work via public transportation: 19.2% (23rd most)
> Transit score: 56.9 (10th best)
> Population: 620,216 (26th largest)

The percentage of Baltimore households without a car rose from 29.3% in 2007 to 31.2% in 2012. One reason may be the quality of walking routes and public transportation in the city; Baltimore received some of the top marks in the nation for both walking and public transportation. The Maryland Transit Administration operates a number of services, including commuter buses and trains, as well as a more-than 15 mile-long subway. In 2012, more than 19% of commuters took public transportation to work, one of the higher percentages in the nation. There are also plans to build a new light-rail system, called the Red Line.
...

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/10-cities-where-no-one-172217897.html
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Indoor/Outdoor Recreation Meeting

Bike Pathsimage
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Baltimore City, Stop Your Bitching

Biking in BaltimoreBy That Guys On Heroin, Medium

This week our city has gone fucking crazy over a blog post by Tracey Halvorsen regarding a recent rash of crime in southeast Baltimore.
...

Let me put this fear into perspective. For every homicide in Baltimore City we have a little over one auto fatality in the metro area. 85% of the homicides happen to prior felons, while the accidents appear to happen evenly across race, class and conviction status.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6128a2.htm

By this logic the people in Baltimore should be fucking terrified of driving cars. Fuck, we should just rent the room above our office and slide into our seats from a fireman’s pole because we’re scared shitless about the horrors of the road.
...

https://medium.com/p/5c9b4982b8a6
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[B' Spokes: Just to note with all this death happening around us on average only one cyclist dies per year in Baltimore, cycling is not as dangerous as most people think.]
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Attitudes about Bicycling Survey

Biking in Baltimore

Welcome to the Attitudes about Bicycling Survey, funded by the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute and administered by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. You are being invited to participate in a research study with a purpose of better understanding bicycling in Baltimore City. To do this, we are aiming to survey as many people as possible who are at least 18 years of age, speak and read English, and who live in Baltimore City. There are a few things that you should know about this survey:
 

  • You will be answering several questions about your opinions on bicycling.
  • The survey takes approximately 10-15 minutes to complete.
  • Your answers will remain completely anonymous.
  • Everyone who completes the survey will have an opportunity to enter a raffle to win one of several gift cards.


http://jhsph.co1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_54uGolsZJKmiJaR
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LEGALLY SPEAKING- THE 1-MILE SOLUTION

Biking ElsewhereVia Bicycle Law

What if there was something you could do to improve your health and fitness, save money, reduce our dependence on foreign oil, improve air quality, and reduce your carbon footprint, all at the same time—would you do it?

Maybe that’s a bit of preaching to the choir here, but that’s the idea behind The 1-Mile Solution. As Andy Cline explains,

The idea is simple: Find your home on a map...Draw a circle with a 1-mile radius around your home. Try to replace one car trip per week within that circle by riding a bicycle or walking. At an easy riding pace you can travel one mile on a bicycle in about seven minutes. Walking takes about 20 minutes at an easy pace.

Now I know Legally Speaking readers generally put in their miles every week, but the concept here is a little different. According to Two-Wheeled Wonder, an article published in the March/April issue of Sierra, “nearly half of all trips in the United States are three miles or less; more than a quarter are less than a mile.” As the Sierra article notes,

Short car trips are, naturally, the easiest to replace with a bike trip (or even walking). Mile for mile, they are also the most polluting. Engines running cold produce four times the carbon monoxide and twice the volatile organic compounds of engines running hot. And smog-forming (and carcinogenic) VOCs continue to evaporate from an engine until it cools off, whether the engine’s been running for five minutes or five hours.

Discussing the Impact of the 1-Mile Solution. Andy Cline cites research from Professor Chandra Bhat that reveals that “the transportation sector accounts for about one-third of all human-generated greenhouse gas emissions. Within that sector, travel by personal vehicles accounts for nearly two-thirds of those emissions.”

With the 1-Mile Solution, Cline proposes a simple means for each of us to reduce the impacts associated with these short trips—once a week, make a trip make a trip of one mile or less from your home by bicycle, or on foot, rather than by car. As Cline observes,

You start out small. You commit to one trip per week by foot or on a bicycle within a 1-mile radius of home. One mile is not far. At a modest pace it’s a 20-minute walk (great exercise!) or a 6-minute bicycle ride. The idea, of course, is that we’ll all see how easy one mile is and then begin replacing two trips per week. Then three. And soon enough, we’re routinely walking and riding within the circle.

Some of us are already making our short trips by bike; others have yet to make the change, or have friends and family who make all of their short trips by car. Because it’s so easy, the 1-Mile Solution is the kind of change that almost anybody can incorporate into their lives. As the year draws to an end, and a new year begins, that’s something to think about.

Wishing all of you a very happy new year,

Bob

(Research and drafting provided by Rick Bernardi, J.D.)

This article, The 1-Mile Solution, originally published on Dec. 31, 2008 on VeloNews.



http://www.bicyclelaw.com/articles/a.cfm/legally-speaking-the-1-mile-solution
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Ride your bike

Biking Elsewhereimage

EARTH-The Operators' Manual
[B' Spokes: What amazes me is how many think 2 miles on a bike is too far for a human to travel under their own power unless they are uber fit.]

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