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Tuesday, June 30 2015 @ 04:47 PM UTC

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Bicycling: The SAFEST Form of Transportation

Biking ElsewhereVia Mr Money Mustache

Of all the objections I get from people about why they can’t ride a bike to get around, perhaps the most frustrating is the claim that bicycling is too dangerous. According to this line of reasoning, we all need the protection of a two-tonne steel cage in order to survive the trip to the office or the grocery store.
...

Under even the most pessimistic of assumptions:

Net effect of driving a car at 65mph for one hour: Dying 20 minutes sooner. (18 seconds of life lost per mile)
Net effect of riding a bike at 12mph for one hour: Living 2 hours and 36 minutes longer (about 13 minutes of life gained per mile)
...

http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/06/13/bicycling-the-safest-form-of-transportation/
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Emmitsburg's Community Heritage Day

Bike PathsUPDATE: Do to the weather forecast, this event has been rescheduled Sunday, June 28th.

**************************************************

Via Department of Natural Resources

As part of Emmitsburg's Community Heritage Day, the Grand Opening of 15 miles of new mountain biking trails will occur this Saturday (June 27th) at 9am at Rainbow Lake. Free giveaways and a group rides will occur after the 9am ribbon cutting.

At Noon, Bike Maryland will sponsor a Bike Safety Rodeo in Community Park. This is free and bikes and helmets will be available for participants.

The Frederick Bicycle Coalition will lead a free five mile road ride and a one mile fun ride. The Frederick County Sheriff's office will be escorting the road ride.

Games, food, music, a parade and fireworks round out the day.

Many other fun events will occur in Town as well, including free admission to the Community Pool all day.

Please visit WWW. EmmitsburgEvents.com for more information.
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Dear Cyclist, the driver gets away with 55% of the time.

Biking ElsewhereVia Bicycle Accident Attorneys

...
Who is at fault? Lets look based on the police reports and citations issued:

-No Violation issued to Cyclist: 27%! This means that 73% of the time when you are hit by a car you will be found in the wrong as having violated some traffic code.
-No Violation issued to Motorist: 55%! This means that only 45% of the time the driver will be found at fault.

Seems unbelievable and unfair doesn’t it? This begs that we look a little further.

What were the actions of the motorists? Cyclists? Fortunately we know. 35% of the time the motorist was going straight. Yep, a whopping 35% of the time a motorist simply was going straight and hit a cyclist. 53% of the time a motorist was either turning right or left. 12% of the time the motorist was doing some “other” thing or it was “unknown” as to what the driver was doing. Lets break this down a bit further. 482 bicycle crashes and in 216.9 of them the driver was found to be in some sort of violation (failed to yield – 16%; unknown -10%; inattention – 8%; other – 7%; speed to fast – 2%; disregarded signal – 2%). How is that a driver can be turning right or left in 255.46 (53%) of the 482 accidents and yet in only 216.9 total accidents they are found to be at fault? How is that the “Failed to Yield” or “Inattention” stats of a combined total of 24% of the violation collisions only account for 115.68 of the bicycle collisions? When in 35% of the collisions (168.7 wrecks) the driver was actually going straight and yet drivers were only cited for inattention 38.56 cases? This is really messed up.
...

https://www.bikeaccidentattorneys.com/dear-cyclist-the-driver-gets-away-with-55-of-the-time/
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Economic Benefits of Bicycling Events

Biking ElsewhereMay 22, 2015 -- The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) released the second phase of a new report, "Community and Economic Benefits of Bicycling in Michigan." The report, funded by federal and state planning and research funds, is the second phase of a larger report describing the economic benefits that bicycling events bring to the economy.

The new report finds that out-of-state participants in all organized bicycling events are responsible for an estimated $21.9 million in economic impact for the state, based on closer analysis of several specific events. Events of various size and type were selected for analysis in order to compare the variety of economic impact:
...

http://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,4616,7-151-9620-355188--,00.html
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What to Do When You're Hit By a Car

Biking in Baltimorehttp://www.citylab.com/navigator/2015/05/what-to-do-when-youre-hit-by-a-car/393809/?fb_ref=Default
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Some nitty-gritty about the Susquehanna River Rail Bridge Project

Biking in MarylandCommuting and Transportation – C&T Subcommittee Chair Greg Hinchliffe submitted an electronic report. Steve Carr said that the Susquehanna River Rail Bridge Project Advisory Board, created by the City of Havre de Grace, issued a report recommending that a new bridge be built across the Susquehanna River at Susquehanna State Park. This park is owned by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Steve said the advisory board never contacted DNR staff about its recommendation prior to the report being issued. While DNR supports the concept of making connections between public lands and the larger community, DNR lacks sufficient information to take a position on this recommendation. Kevin Racine believes small municipalities are not equipped to address bicycle and pedestrian access across the Susquehanna River on their own. John Wetmore noted that bicycle and pedestrian access is not included in the Amtrak Bridge replacement study’s Purpose and Needs statement.

http://www.mdot.maryland.gov/Office_of_Planning_and_Capital_Programming/Bicycle/Documents/Update_2014/041015_MBPAC_Meeting_Mintues.pdf
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Kristerfer Burnett is running for City Council in Baltimore’s 8th district

PoliticsVia Afro,

...
Improving the city’s workforce preparedness will also require improving Baltimore’s public transportation infrastructure. Having companies like Under Armour or Amazon in South Baltimore will not be an economic boon if residents cannot get there in a reasonable time-frame on public transportation, says Burnett. A subpar public transit system is also having an effect on school attendance, something that has ripple effects on the city’s workforce preparedness. “When we talk to teachers and administrators [about] why attendance rates are so low, part of it is the buses are late, or they’re not showing up at all, and so a lot of kids are like, ‘I’ll just stay home,’” said Burnett.
...

- See more at: http://www.afro.com/holton-opponent-challenges-focus-of-balto-politics/#sthash.EouHajce.dpuf
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ADDING NEW ROAD CAPACITY DOESNT IMPROVE CONGESTION

Biking in Baltimore-> Decades of traffic data across the United States shows that adding new road capacity doesn't actually improve congestion. The latest example of this is the widening of Los Angeles' I-405 freeway, which was completed last May after five years of construction and a cost of over $1 billion. "The data shows that traffic is moving slightly slower now on 405 than before the widening (405 Commutes Now a Minute Worse Than Before Carpool Lane: http://bit.ly/1AcBVLL), says Matthew Turner, a Brown University economist.

The main reason, Turner has found, is simple adding road capacity spurs people to drive more miles, either by taking more trips by car or taking longer trips than they otherwise would have. He and University of Pennsylvania economist Gilles Duranton call this the "fundamental rule" of road congestion (The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from US cities: http://bit.ly/1Hevghc): adding road capacity just increases the total number of miles traveled by all vehicles.
In an influential 2011 paper, they looked at the total capacity of highways in each metropolitan area in the US and compared it with the total number of vehicle miles traveled. They found a one-to-one correlation: the more highway capacity a metro area had, the more miles its vehicles traveled on them. A 10 percent increase in capacity, for instance, meant a 10 percent increase in vehicle miles, on average. [http://bit.ly/1S6NEBa]

from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking.



[B' Spokes: What ever mode of transportation gets the most support gets used the most. That should be fairly obvious by now.]

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CENSUS UNDERCOUNTS WALKING AND BIKING

Biking Elsewhere-> The U.S. Census is the most widely cited source of data about how Americans get around, but it only asks about commute trips, and commuting only accounts for about 16 percent of total household travel. What happens when you measure the other 84 percent? Researchers at the University of Minnesota set out to design a better way to track how people move around the Twin Cities region.

The UMN team found that driving decreased in the region between 2000 and 2010, while biking and walking grew. Cycling rose over that period from 1.4 to 2.2 percent of trips. Thats about 190,000 daily trips, or a 58 percent increase. Meanwhile, walking grew from 4.5 to 6.6 percent of trips, a 44 percent increase, or almost three quarters of a million daily trips. Residents of the Twin Cities region typically make about 12 million total daily trips. Whats especially interesting is that the share of biking and walking trips in the UMN survey is much bigger than what the Census indicates about two to three times larger. [http://bit.ly/1rW2snN]

from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking.
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7 STUDIES: ACTIVE TRANS SATISFACTION, OBESITY, DIABETES & CHRONIC DISEASE IMPACTS

Biking Elsewhere-> It seems that not driving has all sorts of positive health benefits. A recent Canadian study (The Happy Commuter: A Comparison of Commuter Satisfaction across Modes: http://bit.ly/1EhfoIN) sorted people by mode of travel walking, biking, driving, bus, intercity train, and intracity metro and found that people who walk, bike, or take the intercity train are more satisfied with their commutes than others.

A 2010 study conducted in Hamilton, Ontario (Enjoyment of Commute: A Comparison of Different Transportation Modes: http://bit.ly/1JWV841), found that bikers and walkers were more satisfied with their commutes than anyone else, as did a nationwide Canadian survey (Commuting to Work: Results of the 2010 General Social Survey: http://bit.ly/1dhpqED) done the same year.

A British study (Associations between Active Commuting, Body Fat, and Body Mass Index: Population Based, Cross Sectional Study in the United Kingdom: http://bmj.co/1edalUD) found that people who walk, bike, or take any form of public transit have lower rates of obesity than people who drive, after controlling for other forms of exercise and socioeconomic factors.

People who walk or bike to work also have lower rates of diabetes (Active Travel to Work and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the United Kingdom: http://bit.ly/1Jwnh3R) and cardiovascular disease (Active Commuting and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: http://bit.ly/1EhgF2o). [Biking or Walking to Work will Make you Happier and Healthier by Joseph Stromberg: http://bit.ly/1AiukLq]

Impact of Changes in Mode of Travel to Work on Changes in Body Mass Index Survey: evidence from the British Household Panel (http://bmj.co/1JwmIXS) found that workers who switched from driving to walking, bicycling or taking public transportation had a significant average reduction in body mass index equal to about 2.2 pounds per person. [http://bit.ly/1c2mRon]

from CenterLines, the e-newsletter of the National Center for Bicycling & Walking.
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